Does Cold Weather Affect Skin? A Dermatologist Can Help | Southlake, TX

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Winter weather in Southlake, TX, often brings cold, dry conditions that present a challenge for our skin. Heaters generally blow dry air that irritates skin indoors, while cold air and wind irritate skin outside. People with pre-existing skin conditions may see exacerbated symptoms during colder months.

Regular skincare routines may not be entirely effective during cold weather. Freezing temperatures outdoors are usually countered by very warm indoor environments, and moving between the two extremes puts a great deal of stress on our skin. Schedule an appointment with a dermatologist if your skin needs extra care during cold snaps.

Winter Rash

Although this may seem odd, skin loses moisture content faster in cold weather than during hot summer months. The outer layer of skin consists of dead skin cells and oil. Low humidity, strong winds, and low temperatures can damage the outer layer of the epidermis, which leaves underlying layers unprotected.

Hot showers can also disrupt the natural oils necessary for moisture retention. Excessively dry skin often develops patches of irritation described as a winter rash. Winter rash is very common in cold climates. People are more likely to develop winter rash if they have a history of other skin conditions, such as eczema, rosacea, dermatitis, sensitive skin, or allergies. Tell your https://compassiondermatology.com/ about any previous acute or chronic skin conditions.

A winter rash can appear anywhere, but it usually affects the hands, arms, or legs. Your dermatologist may diagnose winter rash through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and a process of elimination to rule out allergies. Common symptoms include:

  • redness
  • swelling
  • flaky skin
  • sensitive skin
  • small raised bumps
  • blisters

Skin Conditions Aggravated by Cold Weather

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is characterized by a reddened scalp and loose flakes of dry skin resembling dandruff. Although dandruff only occurs on the scalp, seborrheic dermatitis can occur on any part of the body with hair. Cold, dry weather aggravates this condition and may increase flaking.

Raynaud’s Disease

Raynaud’s disease affects tiny arteries that carry blood to the skin. The arteries narrow and restrict blood flow. The skin on the fingers and toes feel numb and cold due to inadequate circulation. As the disease progresses, fingers and toes change color and sharp, stinging pain may occur. Call a dermatologist if you experience any of these symptoms after exposure to cold air.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic condition with sporadic flare-ups that last weeks or months in between periods of remission. Skin cells multiply approximately 10 times faster than normal during a flare-up. Excess cells die and create patches of raised red plaques of scaly or flaky skin.

The most common sites of psoriasis are the elbows, trunk, knees, and scalp. Exposure to sunlight may relieve psoriasis symptoms to some extent. A dermatologist can use phototherapy units to direct specific wavelengths of light to manage psoriasis as well. Reduced sunlight in Southlake, TX, during winter months, can trigger psoriasis flare-ups.

Eczema

Eczema appears as red, irritated skin with small bumps. The affected area is usually uncomfortable and itchy. Try not to scratch irritated areas. Scratching can break the skin and lead to bleeding or infection. Many say there isn’t any permanent cure for eczema, but a dermatologist can help you manage the condition and take steps toward healthier skin. Flare-ups are more common during colder months because of rapid temperature changes between indoor and outdoor environments. Keeping indoor temperatures as low as possible may reduce the frequency and severity of flare-ups, but this isn’t always practical.

Protect Your Skin

Avoiding cold, dry air is the best way to avoid worsening skin conditions, winter rash, and other cold-related effects. This is not realistic for most people, but your dermatologist can help you keep your skin healthy during cold snaps.

UV Rays

The thought of sunburn in cold weather may not be obvious, but ultraviolet rays are a risk in all seasons. The Skin Cancer Foundation states that snow reflects up to 80% of UV light. You may be exposed to more UV rays during the winter months because reflected rays hit twice. Winter clothing often covers most of our bodies, especially while wearing mittens or gloves, but our faces aren’t usually covered. Ask your dermatologist if sunblock is necessary during your daily routine.

UV rays are stronger at high altitudes, so participating in winter sports may require extra precautions. Many people wear thermal face masks to protect themselves from outdoor temperatures during outdoor sports. Face masks protect skin from UV rays as well.

Moisturizer

Moisturizers are the most important tool for protecting skin in cold weather. A high-quality moisturizer locks water content into your skin. Apply moisturizer to your hands, face, and other exposed areas several times per day. Make sure you apply moisturizer after washing your hands or face. Petroleum jelly creates an excellent barrier over your skin to retain moisture. You can try petroleum substitute products if petroleum jelly itself is too greasy, heavy, or uncomfortable.

Natural Oils

Natural oils are getting quite a bit of attention in the field of health and beauty products. Common oils such as olive, coconut, and argan oil, can moisturize and soothe dry skin. Vegetable shortening was once used as a folk remedy. Shortening is solid at room temperature. It may moisturize and protect the skin, but shortening is so thick it can only be used before bed.

Oils can trigger an allergic reaction, such as contact dermatitis, even if you’ve never had a problem with the same oils in your diet. A dermatologist can administer allergy skin tests to pinpoint the cause of a reaction.

An allergic reaction to one type of oil doesn’t mean you can’t use other moisturizing oils. Consult Compassion Dermatology for any skincare concerns. Your dermatologist can also help you develop a personalized cold weather skincare routine.


What Is The Role Of Dermatology In The Pandemic? | Alliance Keller Area

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COVID-19 has dominated news cycles and headlines in the area and across the United States since it was first identified. The sheer volume of media output concerning COVID is astounding. Even with all this information, the field of dermatology barely gets a nod. This relative lack of information can be misleading. Dermatology has an important role in managing the pandemic.

Dermatology Symptoms of COVID-19

A COVID-induced rash usually occurs at the same time as other symptoms, but it has been reported as the first symptom in a minority of cases. The most commonly reported skin condition is a rash resembling measles. Most cases are associated with moderate COVID infections.

A symptom known as “COVID toes” is characterized by itchy red or purple bumps on toes, fingers, or heels. This symptom is associated with mild viral infections and seems to develop after the affected skin was exposed to cold surfaces or air.

A net-like rash called retiform purpura is the most severe COVID-related symptom. The rash may not look serious, but its appearance is the result of blood clots in small vessels beneath the skin. Reported cases of retiform purpura have only been observed in people that were already hospitalized with severe illness. You will want to contact a dermatology expert.

Secondary Relationships Between COVID and Dermatology

Hand hygiene awareness has reached new heights since the COVID-19 pandemic began. The CDC recommends frequent hand washing to slow transmission of the virus. Health care workers and other ‘front-line’ and essential employees with a variety of job functions are very focused on strict hand washing procedures. This is necessary to slow or prevent COVID infections, but constant hand washing, sometimes with harsh products, can alter or damage skin integrity.

Dermatitis and the Skin Barrier

Healthy skin is a barrier between the body and harmful substances and pathogens in the environment. The stratum corneum, a layer of keratin and lipids, is the major component of a healthy skin barrier.

The American Contact Dermatitis Society predicts an increasing number of irritant contact and allergic contact hand dermatitis cases related to hand hygiene. Effects of frequent hand washing are an indirect, but very important, link between dermatology and the COVID pandemic. Symptoms of both types of contact dermatitis include

  • red rash
  • mild to severe itching
  • dry, cracked or flaky skin
  • swelling
  • burning
  • blisters
  • lichenification (thickening skin with leathery texture and appearance)
  • fluid-filled bumps
  • tenderness and soreness when moving hands or fingers

Hand Hygiene Products

Various types of hand hygiene products include liquid or bar soaps, antiseptic hand washes, alcohol-based hand sanitizers, and synthetic detergents. There are hundreds upon hundreds of hand hygiene products available in the Alliance Keller area, and some products may affect skin negatively.

Soap

The term ‘soap’ is frequently used to describe any cleanser, but true soap is made of lye and fats. Soap has pH levels of 9 to 10.6. It removes dirt, breaks down grease, and deactivates viruses by destroying lipid membranes. Washing hands with soap and warm water has an added benefit of physically removing dirt particles and pathogens from the skin’s surface. Unfortunately, soap also disrupts protective lipids in our skin.

Synthetic Detergent

Synthetic detergents are a mixture of petrolatum derivatives and chemical surfactants. They have a pH between 5.5 to 7, which is similar to pH levels of healthy skin. Chemical surfactants function like soap and deactivate viruses by disrupting lipid membranes. Not all viruses have lipid membranes, but COVID does. Synthetic detergents, like soap, deplete skin’s beneficial lipids.

Antiseptic Hand Wash

Antiseptic hand washes are synthetic detergents or soaps with additional antimicrobial ingredients. Antimicrobials damage viral membranes, which deactivates viruses. Bleach, alcohol, and povidone iodine are effective against bacteria and viruses.

Disinfectant Wipes

Disinfectant wipes usually contain alcohol or other antimicrobial ingredients. Pay close attention to labels when purchasing wipes. Hand wipes and baby wipes are designed for use on skin, while disinfectant wipes are formulated to disinfect surfaces.

Harsh chemicals in disinfectant wipes aren’t safe for skin and may cause severe irritation. Alcohols dissolve lipids, and several types of antimicrobial ingredients can denature proteins, so these wipes present a combined threat to protective components of our skin.

Treat and Prevent Dermatitis

Allergic contact dermatitis develops when skin experiences sensitization to an allergen. Initial exposure to the allergen may not trigger a reaction, but repeated exposure results in inflammation and other dermatitis symptoms. People can develop allergies to many components of hand hygiene products, such as preservatives, surfactants, and antimicrobial substances. Other additives, including perfumes, moisturizing agents, and dyes, are also potential allergens. A dermatology expert can help you.

Many products contain multiple ingredients, so it can be difficult to pinpoint the allergen. People experiencing dermatitis may switch products, but the alternative product might contain the same allergen. Visit your local dermatology clinic to identify the causative substance so you can avoid products with that ingredient in the future.

It isn’t uncommon to develop sensitization to more than one component in hygiene formulations, which can make it difficult to find acceptable products. Your dermatologist can help you find appropriate cleaners and sanitizers.

Irritant contact dermatitis, ICD, isn’t an allergic reaction. Our skin possesses an ‘acid mantle’ to act as a buffer against harsh substances that disrupt protective lipids and proteins. ICD occurs when protective elements in our skin deteriorate. Examples of potentially harmful substances and conditions include alkaline soaps or detergents, hot water, extremely cold water, constant glove use, low humidity, and friction.

Moisturizers can prevent and treat contact dermatitis to some extent. General categories of moisturizers include ointments, lotions, creams, and gels. Many hand hygiene products contain moisturizing ingredients, such as beeswax, petrolatum, glycerin, or emollients. Emollients are fats and oils to replenish lipids in skin. Some moisturizing products contain protein rejuvenators, such as keratin and collagen, to replenish protein as well.

Make an appointment at Compassion Dermatology in the Alliance Keller area if you’re experiencing symptoms of dermatitis. Caring and knowledgeable professionals can help you figure out the underlying cause and develop an effective treatment and prevention plan.


Sensitive Skin Issues | Dermatologist in Southlake, TX

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Persistent and chronic skin sensitivity can be a result of either skin disorders like rosacea or allergies like dermatitis. However, your skin can also be sensitive due to reactions to weather inSouthlake, harsh products and chemicals.

How to Tell if You Have Sensitive Skin?

There are often common signs of sensitive skin. You can tell if you have sensitive skin when you exhibit any of the following symptoms.

Easily Flushed Skin

When you have skin that flushes often and is red, you can have a genetic dermatological condition like rosacea or sensitivity to products and/or weather.

If your skin is irritated and red after using a certain product, you should take caution and not use it further. Consult with a dermatologist in Southlake if you have persistent redness, inflammation or irritation.

Frequent Rashes and Bumps

It is often a clear sign of skin sensitivity if you keep getting rashes and bump spots on your skin, on any surface of your body. This can happen if you use new products.

You should be careful when purchasing new products and consult with store attendants or dermatologists on the best products to use for sensitive skin.

Stinging and Burning

Often using beauty or makeup products that are chemical-based can irritate the skin and cause stinging and burning as well due to skin reactions.  If you have sensitive skin, you tend to have thin skin barriers which cause stinging.

 Dry Patches

Another sign of sensitive skin is dryness. These conditions often occur because of eczema where the skin barriers do not trap moisture. In eczema patients, skin flakes and becomes scaly as it dries.

Eczema patients can seek out dermatological care from dermatologists in Southlake, TX. Dermatologists in Southlake, TX will often prescribe specialized medicine to avoid and relieve flare-ups in the skin barriers.

Dermatologists in Southlake, TX will prescribe steroids for people with persistent and harsh eczema to relieve the patients or dryness and irritation.

Itchy Skin

If you have continuously itchy skin, it might be a sign of skin sensitivity. Itching can be due to excessive showering in hot water or harsh cleansers. Dermatologists in Southlake, TX often recommend using gentler cleansers and moisturizers. Your moisturizer should additionally have ceramide in it.

UV Ray and Weather Sensitivity

If you have sensitive or red skin whenever you are in the sun, you are probably sensitive to UV rays. This is called photosensitivity by dermatologists and can cause rashes on your body and face.

A dermatologist in Southlake will often recommend SPF 30 sunscreen to protect your skin.

Additionally, people can have sensitivity to all kinds of harsh weather. Your skin can become inflamed, especially if you have rosacea, and will need dermatologist-approved chamomile and azulene products.

Excessive Breakouts

If you have a lot of breakouts, it is probably due to skin sensitivity. See, when you have dry or sensitive skin, your skin tends to make a lot of oil which in turn clogs pores and causes breakouts.

How to Deal with Sensitive Skin?

If you have sensitive skin, have no fear. Sensitivity can be easily handled through either of the following measures:

Testing New Products

Always remember to test new beauty or makeup products. It is ideal that you use a small amount behind your ear to see if you are sensitive to the product. Wait a day to determine if the product is suitable and look for signs of inflammation or redness.

It is important to be careful with products in general. You should be cautious with hypoallergenic labels in particular since these labels can be misleading at times.

Buy sunscreens that have physical active ingredients. Physical active ingredients can include elements like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide and are often readily available in Southlake.

Always read the labels before you purchase it and if you have any confusions or concerns, you should always consult with a dermatologist in Southlake, TX on which products to choose.

It is a rule of thumb for The American Academy of Dermatology to use products that have less than ten ingredients.

Be cautious when using new and even old products, read up on the products and ingredients. It is often wise to consult with a dermatologist to determine which products are suitable for you.

Have a Skin-Scare Routine

You should take care of your sensitive skin and use appropriate products. You should use moisturizers several times a day and protect your skin from natural and artificial irritants.

You should wash your face regularly to keep pores unclog. It is wise to use cleansers, moisturizers and sunscreens routinely.

Use Makeup Carefully

When you have sensitive skin, you need to be careful about makeup in particular. Do not use makeup excessively and do not try new products that might cause flare-ups.

It is best to use mineral powders or silicone-based foundation. You should also steer clear of waterproof products like mascara which will need chemical and harsh cleansing products for removal.

You should use pencil eyeliners as liquid liners have irritants like latex. Another thing to keep in mind is to clean and renew your makeup products regularly.

Contact Us!

If you are having skin trouble and live in the Southlakearea, you should come see the dermatologists in Southlake, TX at Compassion Dermatology.

You should visit the dermatologists in Southlake, TX at Compassion Dermatology. We are available for consultations and treatments throughout the week. We can be contacted through this number: 817-380-5911.

Our dermatologists can evaluate moles, pigment changes, growths and inflammations. We check your hair and nails for problems like cuticle growth, hair growth, balding, dandruff.

We will provide consultation services to Southlake residents see if you have any concerns and if you are having skin or hair issues.

We also provide specialized treatments for multiple skin and beauty issues. On offer are services for the skin like chemical peels, Botox injectables, as well as SculpSure, ICON and HydraFacial.

If you have any kind of scarring, from surgery, injuries or acne, we are available for treatments and dermatological care consultations and procedures as well.


Signs that Indicate You Should Visit Your Dermatologist in Southlake, TX Right Away

Did a new pimple grow on your face or a new mole on your forearm? Does your face turn red in specific situations? Pretty common skin issues are generally not concerning and don’t warrant a visit to your dermatologist in Southlake, TX.

On the contrary, there can be instances in which you schedule an appointment right away without further delays. But how do you figure out when you should definitely visit a dermatologist in Southlake, TX and when there isn’t a need? We’ll take you through some of the most common skin problems, and accordingly advise you of the best approach.

Acne

Acne is completely normal and you have nothing to worry about if you notice a few small bumps or red spots on your skin during your teens and 20s. But if you’re suffering from adult acne or feel your skin to be bumpy and blemished on most of the days, then you should schedule an appointment with your dermatologist in Southlake, TX.

If you suffer from acne during adulthood, there could be more things going on with your skin and body than what appears at the surface. Generally, acne appears because of an internal imbalance or maybe even an unhealthy diet. If over the counter medicines don’t seem to treat acne, visit a dermatologist in Southlake, TX and share your concerns.

Cold Sores

Cold sores, oral herpes or fever blisters occur around or near your mouth, lips or gums. Cold sores are small, but can often be painful. They do go away without any medications or specific treatments, but if the issue persists or they appear more frequently, then get in touch with a skilled dermatologist in Southlake, TX.

Dandrufff

If you don’t have a lot of dandruff, then over the counter shampoos and simple treatment plans may help you control them. However, the issue is more concerning if itchy and scaly patches appear on your scalp.  Get yourself examined by a dermatologist in Southlake, TX and seek medical advice. Dandruff may occur because of stress, imbalances in the body or even because of environmental changes. But in most of the cases, it can be cured.

Hair Loss

Hair loss is absolutely normal if it’s within an acceptable range. You do lose around 150 hairs daily, but there shouldn’t be any bald, circular patches on your scalp. The main reasons for hair fall include excessive dyeing, over usage of styling tools, certain medications, hormonal imbalances and stress.

Nail Issues

Do your nails appear to separate from the bed or have grown thicker? Your nails can separate from the bed because of an infection, recent injury or a skin disease. If they thicken, it may be due to nail psoriasis. Your dermatologist in Southlake, TX would assess your condition, and accordingly, suggest a suitable treatment plan for you.

Rash

Rashes can be itchy and painful, appearing due to numerous reasons either because of a skin condition or a certain product that you may have used. Generally, you shouldn’t worry about them except in certain specific situations. For instance, if the rash is circular and seems to have a raised edge, then it might potentially be a ringworm, which is contagious but easily treatable. However, that would only be so when you visit a dermatologist in Southlake, TX and act on their advice.

Eczema

If your skin is sensitive, you may notice certain patches that appear to be mildly itchy, but seem to go away with OTC medicines or on their own. However, if these patches start affecting your sleep and quality of life, you should schedule an appointment with your dermatologist in Southlake, TX immediately. Over the counter medicine for eczema may help you control triggers, but you need to follow a proper treatment plan to completely cure the condition.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin condition which worsens in the presence of certain environmental factors. It is best to visit a dermatologist and let them examine your skin.

Aging Skin

Elasticity losses, losses in face volume, and appearance of fine lines and wrinkles are normal as you age. However, if you are younger and your wrinkles seem to have appeared earlier along with dark spots, then your skin may have been affected by the sun.

UV rays, pollution, your daily skin care routines and even lifestyle habits can affect the manner and speed at which your skin ages. If you’ve already started noticing aging signs, then your dermatologist in Southlake, TX may suggest changes to your daily routine.

Skin Lesion

Skin lesion includes freckles and age spots, which are regarded as normal. However, if skin lesion persists, then there’s a chance you may be suffering from skin cancer.  So you should always be on the lookout for freckles and spots, and if anything appears out of ordinary such as if your spot is larger or uneven, you should visit your dermatologist in Southlake, TX.

Rosacea

Rosacea isn’t concerning if you’re suffering from mild redness over your cheeks and the mid area of the face. But if your skin is sensitive, painful and prone to acne, your dermatologist in Southlake, TX can help you out and suggest possible triggers and their reactions.

Skin Discoloration

Scattered brown spots on your skin are normally okay, but if your cheeks, forehead and upper lips are pigmented, the condition may be associated with birth control pills or pregnancy. Your skin discolors due to irregular hormonal levels & changes, sun damage, injuries and excess melanin. Your dermatologist can suggest medicines and lotions that help you even out your skin tone.

Warts

Warts occur when your skin’s top layer is infected.  Thought they are harmless, they can be contagious so you should seek advice from a dermatologist in Southlake, TX.

 

If you face any of the above skin problems, give the experts at Compassion Dermatology a call. Schedule an appointment, share your concerns and our qualified dermatologists will come up with an effective treatment plan for you.


Keller Dermatology

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

The warm days of summer are typically accompanied by an increased incidence of allergic contact dermatitis. If you recognize your skin problem in the following, contact Compassion Dermatology for a consultation. We will be glad to help you in our Keller Dermatology practice.

Signs and symptoms

Allergic contact dermatitis is characterized by itchy papules, which are small raised pimples or swelling, and redness. The presence of itchy plaques may indicate a chronic form of the condition.

The condition typically develops within a few days in areas that were exposed directly to the allergen. However, some allergens that are poorly absorbed may not cause a reaction for as long as a week after exposure.

Diagnosis

In addition to visual examination, diagnosis may include a culture, patch testing,  testing for nickel, skin biopsy or other tests. If you have an itchy rash, contact our Keller Dermatology practice to schedule a consultation.

Management

The treatment is first to identify the cause and to remove the identified allergen. Topical corticosteroids are a common treatment for allergic contact dermatitis. Severe allergic contact dermatitis, such as from poison ivy, often needs to be treated over a 2-week course of medication.

Remember, the identification and removal of any potential causal agents are required. Without removal of the cause, the patient remains at risk for recurrence, and at increased risk for chronic dermatitis. In addition, those with chronic dermatitis may develop an allergy to topical corticosteroids. A patch test can determine if a person is allergic to topical corticosteroids. Contact our Keller Dermatology practice today to put an end to your allergic contact dermatitis.

Contact Dermatitis Vs. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis is often confused with allergic contact dermatitis. Contact dermatitis is inflammation of the skin due to direct damage from chemicals. As previously stated, allergic contact dermatitis is an allergic reaction, and not direct skin damage from chemicals. If you are unsure of the identity and cause of your skin issue, our Keller Dermatology staff can provide the healing you need.

A detailed history is essential in evaluating a patient with allergic contact dermatitis prior to patch testing. The history helps to identify potential causes of allergic contact dermatitis, and helps to determine the potential allergens that should be included in patch testing.

The Causes

Allergic contact dermatitis results from skin contact with an allergen to which the patient has a specific sensitivity. The resulting allergic reaction causes inflammation of the skin manifested by redness, swelling and the small pimples.

Approximately 25 chemicals are commonly responsible for as many as half of all cases of allergic contact dermatitis. Nickel, preservatives, dyes, and fragrances are especially common allergens. Compassion Dermatology can provide the help you need to resolve this uncomfortable condition in our Keller Dermatology clinic.

  • Poison oak and ivy are an example of acute allergic contact dermatitis in the U.S. Allergic contact dermatitis from these plants is characterized by acute dermatitis that develop where oils from the plant has been in direct contact with the skin. Contact our Keller Dermatology to schedule treatment for your poison oak or ivy.
  • Nickel is a leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis, and the incidence is on the rise in the U.S. Europe has enacted regulations resulting in a reduction of the allergen exposure in women. The reaction to nickel is typically localized to the areas where nickel containing objects are worn, or are in contact with the skin. Nickel in the diet of allergic individuals may result in vesicles on the sides of the fingers.
  • Rubber Gloves-Any individual who wears rubber gloves and experiences dermatitis is is considered allergic to one or more chemicals contained in them, unless a patch test indicates otherwise.
  • Hair Dye-The chemical p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is a common component in permanent hair dye products. Exposure may cause acute dermatitis with severe swelling of the face.
  • Textiles-Persons allergic to dyes and clothing containing chemicals added to textiles often develop dermatitis on the trunk. Individuals allergic to chemical containing clothing can find relief by wearing 100% cotton. In addition, new clothing is more likely to induce contact dermatitis. Allergens may diminish in concentration with repeated washing.
  • Preservatives-Preservatives are added to cosmetics, moisturizers, shampoos, sunscreens and topical medications. They are a common source of allergic contact dermatitis. Formaldehyde,  Quaternium-15,  isothiazolinones and methylisothiazolinone are frequent causes to watch out for. We can assist you in identifying the causes of your skin condition. Contact Keller Dermatology today.
  • Fragrances-Fragrances are found in perfumes, colognes, shampoos, aftershaves, lotion, deodorants, soaps, and other products. If you are allergic to fragrances, choose fragrance-free products. Deodorants are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis caused by fragrances. This is because they occlude skin that is often abraded by shaving in women.
  • Benzocaine-Persons who are allergic to benzocaine can safely use or be injected with lidocaine (Xylocaine), which does not cross-react with benzocaine. The patch test typically includes testing for Benzocaine allergy.
  • Photo allergy-Photo-allergic contact dermatitis not a common reaction. The allergy may be due to ultraviolet (UV) light, or an allergic reaction when a chemical is present on the skin, and combined with sufficient ultraviolet light.

Patient Education

The best prognosis is related to avoiding exposure to known allergens. This includes reading the label for the known allergens identified. A thorough examination and testing will reveal the chemicals and plants you need to avoid. Compassion Dermatology can help you with your skin issues. Contact our Keller Dermatology office today.


Contact Dermatitis | Dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX

Contact dermatitis is a localized rash or skin irritation resulting from contact with irritants or substances you are allergic to. Inflammation occurs in the outermost layer of skin, called the epidermis, and the layer beneath it called the dermis. Discomfort is often present with burning and/or itching in potentially large areas. The affected area often takes from days to weeks to heal. However, if contact with the irritant continues, the skin rash will not clear until the irritant is removed. In addition, the condition can become chronic. If you are experiencing skin irritation that will not heal, a dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX can help you. Contact Compassion Dermatology today to schedule a consultation.

Irritant Vs. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Irritant dermatitis typically affect only the skin actually in contact with the irritant. On the other hand, allergic dermatitis can affect larger areas. Sings and symptoms of either condition can include:

  • Red rash is the most common sign, and appears quickly after contact in irritant dermatitis. A skin rash may not develop in allergic dermatitis for 24 to 72 hours after exposure to the allergen. The rash is raised and may be weeping, crusty or welted.
  • Irritant dermatitis is typically more painful and burning than itchy, its symptoms may include blisters or welts. Allergic dermatitis tends to be more itchy than painful. A dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX can help you with either type of dermatitis. We can prescribe a treatment plan for your dermatitis that will soothe the itch and burning, and promote the healing of your skin.
  • Blisters, welts and hives typically form in the shape of the irritant of exposure.

A Compassion Dermatology dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX can identify dermatitis, its type and an effective treatment for you.

Allergic Dermatitis

There are a number of potential irritants that may be involved with allergic dermatitis. Common causes include nickle, gold, chromium, poison oak, poison, sumac or poison ivy. In addition, latex (such as gloves or bandages), detergents, cleaners, perfumes, dyes and many others may be causing your skin rash. Sources include jewelry, the metal in jeans, cosmetics and hair dyes, and even foods, for example. A number of children often experience a burning rash around their mouth after eating certain fruits. It can be prevented by rinsing the affected area off after eating. If the rash extends to the inside of the mouth see your pediatrician.

Irritant Contact Dermatitis

This category of contact dermatitis is commonly caused by either chemical irritants, such as solvents or alkali, for example, or physical irritants, such as the plant poison ivy.

An example of a common form of contact dermatitis is a baby’s diaper rash.  The following tips treat and can prevent diaper rash:

  • Change a soiled or wet diaper as soon as possible.
  • If you use baby wipes, be sure to use wipes that are alcohol and fragrance free. Otherwise use water and a soft washcloth. For severe rashes, gently rinse the area with lukewarm water and allow to air dry. Allow the child to go without a diaper as long as possible when a diaper rash is present.
  • Use a zinc oxide diaper rash cream to act as a barrier and promote healing. Apply the cream liberally.
  • Watch for the signs of a skin infection. Potential signs include blisters, fever, infectious drainage, a rash that worsens or will not resolve and a fussy baby or one in obvious pain. If your child appears to have a worsening rash or signs of infection, contact your pediatrician, or contact a dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX.

Diagnosis

Allergic dermatitis relies on identification of the allergen, in order to avoid it and future problems. Patch testing is used to identify potential allergies. In the patch test, small amounts of potential allergens are applied to adhesive patches, and are placed on the skin. The patches remain on the skin for a few days, afterwards, the skin is checked for a reaction. In general, contact dermatitis may also depends on tissue morphology, immunological findings and histology to assist in the diagnosis. Irritants may also cross over into both allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Contact a Compassion Dermatology  dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX today to schedule a consultation for your skin problems.

At Home Care

Use the following tips for self care when you or a loved one experience contact dermatitis. If improvement is not noted within a few days, contact Compassion Dermatology to schedule a consultation with a dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX:

  • Use calamine lotion for itching
  • Apply cold, moist compresses to blistered areas for 30 minutes, 3 times a day
  • Talk to your doctor about using oral antihistamines, such as Benadryl to relieve itching
  • Avoid scratching the affected area, and trim your nails or cover the area with a bandage to protect it
  • After contact with a known allergen or irritant, wash with soap and cool water

When to Contact a Dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX

When the rash fails to improve after 2 to 3 days of home care, or when the pain and/or itching is intense or worsening, contact your doctor or a dermatologist in Fort Worth, TX. Treatment of contact dermatitis typically consists of lotions, creams and or oral medications. At Compassion Dermatology, you will experience the commitment of our experienced medical staff to resolve your skin issues with a holistic approach. Give us a call today.